Managing Money in Marriage

When you’re madly in love and on the way to the altar, most of us can’t wait to say I do’ as you embark on the marriage journey. But before you do, it’s important to figure out how you’re going to manage money as a couple. If you’re already married or maybe happily single, these tips can still apply to you, as money management principles are universal and cut across many spheres.

Money can be one of the most difficult topics for couples and it’s important to think about the ways that marriage will affect your financial picture. Money is the number one cause of disagreements between married couples. With that in mind, here are five money problems in marriage – and some advice to help you resolve them.

Number 1: Different Financial Personalities

The first big financial problem that can affect marriages is when each partner has a different financial personality. By that, we mean they think about money differently.

The most common division of personality might be the fact that one partner is a spender – someone who likes to buy new things and doesn’t mind paying a high price for them – while the other partner is inherently a saver, preferring to seek bargains and spend less frequently.

That’s an issue that can lead to big problems if not addressed. One way to handle it is to talk about it openly and calmly. Each of you should express your concerns and work out a blended spending style that’s respectful of both your needs.

Number 2: Hidden Spending

On a related note, if couples don’t talk about spending and money management openly, there’s a risk that one partner may hide their spending from the other partner. If it’s not checked, it can turn into a problem and erode the trust between the two.

Having joint accounts makes it difficult for anybody to hide their spending. While it may not be easy to talk about spending habits, it’s important to do it and to make it clear that part of your responsibility as a couple is to be open and up front about spending. You can also create budgets to help you spend within agreed-upon limits.

If it’s still a problem, then the potential exists that the person with the spending problem may need outside assistance from a therapist or counsellor.

Number 3: Hidden Debt

What happens if one spouse runs up their debts and doesn’t tell their partner about them? This is a problem that people can bring into a relationship if they don’t reveal they’ve got a significant amount of credit card debt. Or, it can arise after you get married if hidden spending turns into hidden debt.

If you have a spending problem and you run up a debt, you have a responsibility to tell your partner because it can affect them too. For example, if you have unpaid debt and the two of you want to buy a home, delinquencies on your credit card can prevent you from qualifying or ensure you get stuck with a high interest rate.

The solution is to talk about spending and debt without shame and to reveal any hidden debt to your partner immediately. Then, work out a debt reduction plan alone or with a trusted friend with finance skills or a financial planner. That way, you’ll be able to pay it off and improve your financial picture together.

 Number 4: Financial Power Plays

When one spouse earns more money than the other, it can create financial inequality and lead to resentment – especially if it’s not something you talk about.

It’s not uncommon for one spouse to choose to stay at home after starting a family. The spouse who’s at home is working full-time at childcare but not earning any income for it. That can create tension.

To avoid this problem, have a conversation about what staying at home means for your relationship. Both partners should be on board. The same is true if one partner makes a lot more than the other. Divide expenses equitably and check in with one another regularly to tackle any problems as they arise.

Number 5: Money and Your Extended Families

One of the trickiest financial problems to navigate is when one spouse has a family member who’s in financial distress. It’s natural to want to help people you love but it’s undeniably stressful when the help is ongoing and the money is not going to be paid back.

As you might imagine, the solution is honesty and transparency in any financial transactions involving your family. It’s important for both partners to be on board. It may also be helpful to set boundaries on how much you’ll loan (or give) and how much you’re willing to let it affect your lives.

It’s also worth keeping in mind that in some cases, you may want to have a family policy around giving money if you’ve got a family member who’s irresponsible and always seems to need help. You might be better off getting them a couple of appointments with a financial planner than throwing money after the problem.

Money can cause disagreements in marriage, but nearly all of the financial problems in marriage can be solved with honesty and clear communication. Secrecy and dishonesty won’t help and, in most cases, will just make the problem worse.

Happy Money Management!

Agnes Chikukwa Hove, Brief Profile

Agnes finds fulfilment in being a Financial Wellness Coach. She coaches individuals, couples and organisations on effective personal financial management, and has effectively done so for the past 8 years. Agnes is a seasoned strategist who is currently the Chief Executive Officer of Sequor Consulting a Pan-African SME Development, Consulting and Advisory organization. She is also the Treasurer at African Women in Agriculture (AWiA) a women’s empowerment organization. She possesses a Master of Science (MSc) Degree in Strategic Management, a Business Management (BBA) Degree and a Diploma in Nursing.

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Note:

The content provided here is not legal, tax, accounting, financial or investment advice. Please consult with legal, tax, accounting, financial or investment professionals based on your specific needs or questions you may have. We do not make any guarantees as to accuracy or completeness of this information, do not support any third-party companies, products, or services described here, and take no liability or legal obligations for your use of this information.

Agnes Hove

Agnes Chikukwa Hove
Agnes' mission is to humbly serve God by inspiring and empowering people to live a life of health, creativity and passion while they uplift others!

She possesses a Master of Science (MSc) Degree in Strategic Management, a Business Management (BBA) Degree and a Diploma in Nursing.
Agnes is a seasoned motivational speaker, who has a passion for, and is experienced in speaking on the following: Personal Finances, Entrepreneurship, Women in business, Personal Growth, Health/ Wellbeing and Leadership.

Agnes is currently the Finance Director at African Women in Agriculture (AWIA). She has held significant leadership positions at the helm of a number of organizations including her experience as the Chief Executive of Careways (Pty) Ltd, a Health and Wellness company, and the Executive Director for a Pan African Non-profit organisation. She has over 20 years’ experience as a senior manager within Southern African companies across a diverse range of industries. Her hobbies include gardening and playing golf.

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